August 1, 2023

CHINA: Super Typhoon Doksuri Hit Beijing On Saturday. Flood Control Reservoir Opened Twice To Relieve Beijing Flooding Pressure But Hurt Lower Altitude Cities With Possible Thousands Dead.

Sky News Australia published August 1, 2023: At least 20 people dead in China floods. At least 20 people have been killed in flooding by the remnants of last week’s Typhoon Doksuri in China's capital, Beijing.
CBC News published August 1, 2023: Heavy rain batters Beijing as flooding leaves at least 11 dead. Deadly downpours in Beijing since Saturday have led to widespread flooding after super typhoon Doksuri hit China last week. At least 11 people have died and thousands have been evacuated from their homes.

DW, Germany local
written by Staff
Tuesday August 1, 2023

At least 20 people are dead and several missing as heavy rain brought on by the leftovers of typhoon Doksuri continues to inundate northern China. Meteorologists say another storm is on the way.

Torrential rain continued on Tuesday in Beijing, as storm Doksuri dumped the average rainfall for the entire month of July on the city within 40 hours.

At least 11 people have died in the Beijing area, with another 13 missing, Chinese state broadcaster CCTV reported on Tuesday. Two victims were workers "killed on duty during rescue and relief." The number of missing was revised after 14 people were found safe.

In neighboring Hebei province, nine people were killed and six were missing, CCTV reported.

Chinese President Xi Jinping called for "every effort" to rescue people lost or trapped, and for authorities to restore conditions back to normal as soon as possible.

In the neighboring Hebei province, precipitation from Saturday to Monday at one local weather station was more than what is usually measured in over six months, with rainfall amounting to 1,003 mm (39.4 inches).

Rivers and streams in the capital and surrounding region have swollen to dangerous levels. The rising water has forced authorities to use a flood control reservoir for the first time since it was built over two decades ago.

Some 150,000 households in Beijing's hard-hit western Mentougou district had no running water, a local newspaper reported on Tuesday. The city has dispatched 45 water tankers to offer emergency supplies.

"This morning it was crazy, the water overflowed the Mentougou river and the whole avenue was flooded," Guo Zhenyu, a 49-year-old Mentougou resident, told the AFP news agency. Another Beijing resident, Qin Quan, told AFP, "I'm old but I've never seen flooding like this before in my life."

Roads closed, trains stranded, residents evacuated

Authorities in Beijing have sealed off over 100 mountain roads and evacuated 52,000 people from their homes in Beijing. Many train and subway stations are closed

The Chinese government deployed four military helicopters with 26 personnel on Tuesday to deliver supplies to stranded train passengers in Beijing, according to state media.

Local media reported chaotic scenes of high-speed trains stranded for as long as 30 hours without access to food or drinking water.

Another typhoon approaches China

Beijing's local government said the rainfall over the last four days was more than what was recorded during a severe storm in 2012 that killed 79 people.

According to state media, thunderstorms and rainfall are forecast in Beijing and neighboring Tianjin and Hebei through Tuesday.

Meanwhile, China is preparing for another typhoon named Khanun, which is expected to make landfall later in the week on China's east coast after crossing over southern Japan. Khanun is set to be China's sixth tropical storm so far this year.

Doksuri, formerly a super Typhoon, is one of the strongest storms to hit modern day China. It made landfall on Friday in Fujian province, where it destroyed some 18,000 houses and forced 562,000 people to evacuate.

Before that, the deadly storm caused devastation in the Philippines and Taiwan.

 👇***FRIDAY***👇
Associated Press published July 26, 2023: Typhoon Doksuri leaves at least six dead in the Philippines. Typhoon Doksuri lashed northern Philippine provinces with ferocious wind and rain Wednesday, leaving at least six people dead and displacing thousands of others. (AP Video: Bernie Dela Cruz) 

Associated Press
written by Jim Gomez contributed from Manila, Philippines
Friday July 28, 2023 at 4:43 PM PDT

BEIJING — Typhoon Doksuri made landfall in China after bringing deadly landslides to the Philippines.

The storm plowed into the eastern province of Fujian on Friday morning after bringing heavy rains and gale-force winds to parts of Taiwan, especially the Penghu island group, also known as the Pescadores.

In the Philippines, a week of stormy weather across the main island of Luzon caused 39 deaths, including 26 killed in the capsizing of a passenger ship. At least 13 people were reported killed earlier due to Doksuri’s onslaught, mostly due to landslides, flooding and toppled trees, and thousands were displaced, disaster response officials said. More than 20 others remained missing, including four coast guard personnel whose boat overturned while on a rescue mission in hard-hit Cagayan province, disaster response officials said Friday.

The storm caused widespread power outages and agricultural damage in the archipelagic country and prompted the suspension of work, classes and sea travel at the height of the onslaught, officials said, adding they were monitoring another approaching storm.

China has upped its typhoon preparedness through text messaging and notices on social media. In Fujian, more than 400,000 people had been moved to safety, hundreds of ships returned to ports and transportation suspended. Businesses and summer school classes were also ordered suspended and the public was urged to stay indoors. In the city of Quanzhou, the roof of a sports stadium was partially torn off, but there were no immediate reports of injuries.

After hitting the coast, most typhoons tend to lose strength while moving into the mountainous interior of southeastern China, although they sometimes linger over areas, dropping heavy rain.

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